2016 Health for Humanity Report
2016 Health for Humanity Report
2016 Health for Humanity Report
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According to the Global Footprint Network,1 every year since 1971, humanity has demanded more from nature than it can regenerate, causing an ecological deficit. Just as a business cannot continue to operate at a financial deficit for an extended period and hope to survive, we can’t expect natural systems to operate at a deficit and continue to provide the same level of services. To break this cycle, we are changing our thinking about managing waste, in order to deliver value to our customers, while respecting the limits of the Earth’s finite resources.

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The concept of a circular economy is not new to Johnson & Johnson; we have been systematically reducing the raw materials we use, and finding alternatives to landfill disposal of our waste streams for years. We have set goals to reduce the amount of waste disposed since 2005. Our waste reduction efforts continue, and we are going one step further, as we seek to increase the diversion rates of waste from our manufacturing practices.

For more information about our management approach, see EHS&S Governance.

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At our Janssen site in Geel, Belgium, we have set the stage to pilot “Plant on a Truck,” a system treatment method that will remove toxic components, recycle valuable components, and eliminate the need for incineration of waste streams, thereby closing material loops, and realizing significant hazardous waste and wastewater reductions. The team driving the “Plant on a Truck” concept, one of our 2016 Sustainability Accelerator Grant recipients, are featured L to R: Chris Koch, Frank Peeters, Benny Ghoos, Johan Van den Eynde, Bert Verstappen and Geert van der Vorst.

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Waste Generation and Disposal

Over the past year, our total waste generated2 increased from 171.7 million kilograms in 2015 to 177.9 million kilograms in 2016, an increase of 3.6 percent, reflecting an increase in our non-hazardous waste amounts, and a small decrease in hazardous waste generation. The increase in non-hazardous waste generated was due primarily to a few locations where wastewaters previously treated on-site had to be transported off-site, and due to non-routine remediation activity.

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Our off-site waste disposal increased by 4.5 percent, from 80.0 million to 83.6 million kilograms, reflecting a decrease in hazardous waste disposal off-site, and an increase in nonhazardous waste off-site disposal. In 2016, we established a baseline of our non-hazardous wastes currently being reused or recycled, at 69 percent. Going forward, this baseline will be used to measure progress against our effort to achieve an 80 percent recycling rate for these wastes. GRI 306-2

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Environmental Remediation

Johnson & Johnson is remediating contamination at 18 current or former facilities. In 2016, we spent approximately $5.2 million remediating these facilities.


1 Global Footprint Network National Footprint Accounts, 2017 Edition downloaded from http://data.footprintnetwork.org

2 Includes data from all manufacturing and R&D locations, including Johnson & Johnson Indonesia, which was not covered in 2015 data. For information on how data from acquisitions and divestitures are managed, please see the About This Report section of this report. Exceptions will be noted in the relevant sections in which they occur. Data have been adjusted to reflect divestitures and acquisitions.

2016 Health for Humanity Report

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